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Among the documents declassified which were among thousands of pages of documents and other materials seized by Navy SEALs during the raid on bin Laden’s compound is a letter is which he wonders if an Iranian dentist have planted a tracking device in his wife’s tooth.

Osama while writing using the nom de guerre Abu Abdallah said the size of the chip is about the length of a grain of wheat and the width of a fine piece of vermicelli.

According to the documents, Osama had a fear of Fear of surveillance and in one letter, he warns that a suitcase used to deliver a ransom could contain a tracking device.

The documents come at a time when Apple is in a fight against government orders to break open locked iPhones, which could be the legal authorization for “virtually limitless” surveillance under the Internet of Things.

A federal judge’s order rejected a government request in a New York drug case yesterday. Midway through his lengthy opinion, Magistrate Judge James Orenstein made that point clear as he dismantled the staggering government claim that Apple’s software licensing arrangement was proof that the company was “sufficiently close” to consumer devices that it could be compelled to unlock them.

In a letter to customers on Feb. 16, Apple CEO Tim Cook said he opposed the order because it would undermine necessary security measures put in place to prevent hacking and unauthorized access to iPhones.

The case has sparked a national debate over whether the government’s need to access devices outweighed the public’s right to privacy and data security.