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September_cover_webEditorial

Welcome to yet another issue of Your Most Contemporary Technology Magazine.

This issue, released on the back of one of the hottest legal battles technology has seen in history, highlights the ever-growing relationship between us, humans, and those small handheld “rectangles” called mobile phones.

From political battles to the dynamics of a first date, our lives are being reshaped by the constant presence of our phones - and our evolving relationship with the idea of being connected to everyone and everything all the time.

The Cheetah Robot runs faster than Usain Bolt

The robot Cheetah, developed by Boston Dynamics, breaks Usain Bolt's record

A robot called Cheetah has set a new world speed record for legged robots, running faster than the fastest human.

The headless machine, funded by the Pentagon, reached 28.3mph (45.5km/h) when tested on a treadmill.

NAIROBI, Kenya, Airtel Africa today announced that it is working with the GSMA to initiate a project to provide approximately 250,000 small-holder farmers in Kenya reliable and relevant agricultural information via their mobile phones.

The innovative project, dubbed ‘Sauti ya Mkulima’ (Swahili for voice of the farmer), aims to provide farmers with access to pertinent agriculture-related information, advice and research that will help them make better decisions about their crops, increasing the productivity of their yield, as well as their potential income.

airtel-logoNAIROBI, Kenya, Airtel has entered into a strategic cooperation agreement with leading South African financial services group, Sanlam, for the distribution of insurance and health funding products.

This agreement covers seven African countries, on a non- exclusive basis, in which both companies have a presence, namely Kenya, Ghana, Tanzania, Zambia, Uganda, Malawi and Nigeria.

While everyone is all crazy about Apple's billion-dollar patent victory over Samsung, the psychological355511-apple-samsung effect on consumers has been ignored.Several times throughout the case, the same point was driven home: the Android phone is identical to, and perhaps better than, the iPhone.

This "revelation," which Android users have always known, will easily cost Apple more than a billion dollars in sales.

Humans aren’t the only species on the planet with a penchant for electronic gadgets. Zookeepers across the United States and Canada are discovering that apes also get excited about apps.
As part of a program called Apps for Apes, 12 zoos across the two countries have been incorporating iPads into the enrichment time allotted for orangutans, the giant furry red primates native to Indonesia and Malaysia.
“We’re finding that, similar to people, they like touching the tablet, watching short videos of David Attenborough for instance, and looking at other animals and orangutans,” said Richard Zimmerman, founding director of Orangutan Outreach, the New York City-based non-profit that runs the program.
Twice weekly, orangutans are provided with access to the tablets. The animals spend from 15 minutes to a half hour using different apps depending on their attention span.
Apps geared towards children that stimulate activities such as painting, music and memory games are among the most popular apps with the apes.
At the Toronto Zoo, zookeeper Matthew Berridge uses apps such as Doodle Buddy for drawing, Montessori Counting Board and Activity Memo Pocket, a memory game, in addition to playing YouTube videos for the apes.
“It’s a lot like when we’re showing children pop-up books,” said Zimmerman, adding that the orangutans are among the most intelligent primates, with the intelligence level of a young child.
Zookeepers are also investigating how communication apps, such as those for the autistic, can help the animals to express themselves better, according to Zimmerman.
“Let’s say an orangutan has a toothache. He or she would be able to then tap on the iPad on a picture of a tooth and communicate it that way,” he explained.
One very intelligent, but armless, orangutan at the Center for Great Apes in Wauchula, Florida is so intent on using the device that she uses her feet to navigate through the touchscreens.
“When you see the enjoyment and focus on their faces it’s special, especially for orangutans who are in an enclosure all day and you’re providing enrichment for them,” said Zimmerman.
Because the tablets are so fragile the zookeepers handle the apps while the animals navigate the touchscreen, but the organization is investigating creating larger, more rugged casings.
The program, which is not meant to replace physical stimulation or climbing, also aims to raise awareness about the threats orangutans face in the wild.
“We’re hoping that in that moment we can make a breakthrough with (zoo visitors] and say, ‘Listen, these are beautiful animals that are obviously curious and intelligent and not too far from us and this is what they’re dealing with in the wild,’” said Zimmerman.
Orangutans are critically endangered because of the rapid deforestation and expansion of palm oil plantations into their rainforest homes, he added.
The program, which relies on donated iPads, will soon be expanding to zoos across Australia, New Zealand, Japan and Europe.

orangutan-on-ipad-1-640x441Humans aren’t the only species on the planet with a penchant for electronic gadgets. Zookeepers across the United States and Canada are discovering that apes also get excited about apps.

As part of a program called Apps for Apes, 12 zoos across the two countries have been incorporating iPads into the enrichment time allotted for orangutans, the giant furry red primates native to Indonesia and Malaysia.

9431433-satellite-dish-and-earth-in-digital-abstract-backgroundMultiChoice’s eventual switch-over from its current satellite to the new Intelsat–20 satellite will affect subscribers in flats or complexes that opted for a single cable DStv installation.

Previously, a MultiChoice spokesperson explained that they have secured more capacity on IS–20 than they have on IS–7, and that they plan to launch more services with the additional capacity.

In his 1997 book, Samsung Chairman Lee Kun-hee wrote that a successful company needs a "heightened sense of crisis", so that it always looks ahead even when it's doing well, and needs to be able to respond to change.
It's a credo that has driven Samsung Electronics to become the world's biggest technology firm by revenue - it sells more televisions, smartphones and memory chips than anyone else - and makes the group a must-visit case study for a stream of Chinese firms seeking to tap the secrets of Korean success.
In this month's PC Pro
We go behind the scenes at Samsung's Ultrabook factory - on sale 13 September
But, in the wake of last month's damaging US patent ruling, which Samsung has said it will appeal - the Korean group was fined more than $1 billion after a jury found it had copied key features of Apple's iPhone - the group's top-down command structure and decision-making process are blamed for stifling creativity.
What's been good for getting things done quickly, such as making bold decisions on big investments in chips and display screens, may not now best suit a company that needs to shift from being a "fast follower" - quick to match others' products - to an innovator.
Within Samsung, where some designers feel overlooked and undermined, there are calls for a change of tack.
The "constant crisis" has worked well, helping Samsung overtake Japanese technology brands Sony, Sharp and Panasonic in chips, TVs and displays, end Nokia's decade-long supremacy in handsets and overtake Apple in smartphones.
But that has come with a big reputational hit - that Samsung makes knock-off products.
"Crisis of design"
"It's a crisis of design," JK Shin, head of Samsung's mobile division told staff in February 2010 as Samsung worked on its first Galaxy phone in a panicky response to the iPhone's smash-hit debut, according to an internal memo filed to a US court as part of Apple's lawsuit.
"Influential figures outside the company come across the iPhone, and they point out that Samsung is dozing off.'
"All this time, we've been paying all our attention to Nokia, and concentrated our efforts on things like 'folder', 'bar', 'slide,' yet when our UX (user experience) is compared to the unexpected competitor Apple's iPhone, the difference is truly that of Heaven and Earth."
The sense of crisis and urgency to catch Apple drove Samsung designers and engineers to opt for a concept that best matched the look and feel of the iPhone, according to one Samsung designer, who isn't authorised to talk to the media and didn't want to be identified.
"Designers have lots of unique and creative ideas, but these have to be loved by the top decision-makers. The problem was, because they were so fascinated by the Apple design, these ideas weren't really satisfactory to please the top level," said the designer.
"I think elsewhere top managers respect their chief designer's decision, but at Samsung, they overrule designers and have the final say about what design we go with. That limits our capability. To be better than a good fast follower, Samsung needs a more horizontal culture and to empower designers."
Read more: How Samsung's crisis culture "stifles creativity" | News | PC Pro http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/376684/how-samsungs-crisis-culture-stifles-creativity#ixzz25OtnEdAY

In his 1997 book, Samsung Chairman Lee Kun-hee wrote that a successfulsamsung-galaxy-pocket-1company needs a"heightened sense of crisis", so that it always looks ahead even when it's doing well, and needs to be able to respond to change.

It's a credo that has driven Samsung Electronics to become the world's biggest technology firm by revenue - it sells more televisions, smartphones and memory chips than anyone else - and makes the group a must-visit case study for a stream of Chinese firms seeking to tap the secrets of Korean success.

Samsung-Galaxy-S3After securing a major court victory, Apple has amended its filing in another patent suit against Samsung, claiming the Samsung Galaxy SIII and Galaxy Note violates a number of patents held by the Cupertino, California-based tech giant.

The filing, first spotted by Apple Insider, was made on Friday and claims that the devices infringe on eight Apple patents, including the universal search patent, slide to unlock, and word completion patents.

hp-touch-screen-spectre-xt

Microsoft and its partners have found an opening against Apple. That's rare these days.

The Windows 8 touch screen is the first real change that has come to Windows laptops in a long time.

I would put it right up there with the trackpad and, more recently, the MacBook Pro Retina display.