(Photo Credit: Mashable)
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Google has added a small yet nifty feature in its Gmail service that is likely to increase the productivity of users. The search giant’s email service will now be able to recognize texts as contacts, addresses and more. These will then be converted into links.

“Starting today, Gmail and Inbox by Gmail on Android, iOS, and the web will begin converting text to interactive hyperlinks whenever they detect phone numbers, addresses, and email addresses in emails,” said the blog post.

For instance, if an email mentions an address, it will automatically become a clickable link. Clicking on it will open that address in Google Maps. Similarly the phone numbers will become clickable and tapping on them will open the number in the handset’s dial pad.

Last month, Gmail for iOS got a new feature that lets users receive an alert for suspicious links in the emails. The alert from Gmail will come in form of a box, letting iOS users know how it is leading to an untrusted website. Users can, however, still choose to go ahead and open the link.

If a user clicks on a link that Google thinks is dangerous, it will show a web page saying;

“The site you are trying to open has been identified as a forgery designed to trick you into disclosing financial, personal or other sensitive information.” Users will again be given the option to go ahead or even report an incorrect warning.

Google this year has rolled out couple of other features for Gmail in order to curb phishing attacks.

Back in May, Gmail users faced a gigantic phishing attack. The scam looked like a regular mail alert with the subject “ABC [Name of the person] has shared a document on Google Docs with you.” The mail included a Google Doc link, which appeared legitimate but was actually not. This gave hackers access to the user’s Gmail account information.