Netflix CEO and Founder Reed Hastings at the launch of streaming internet subscription services for movies and television shows in Toronto. Image Credit: Bnnovation
Netflix CEO and Founder Reed Hastings at the launch of streaming internet subscription services for movies and television shows in Toronto. Image Credit: Bnnovation
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A site shows the huge amount of content that can be found on Netflix around the world.

Netflix announced last week that it would be cracking down on “unblockers” tools that allow people to see films and TV that’s on Netflix in other countries. But there are still plenty of ways to get around that ban and still huge amounts of videos on other countries’ catalogues.

A site called the “unofficial Netflix online Global Search”, or uNoGS, allows people to search through every country’s entire library. Searching for a film or just selecting from a range of Netflix ratings or release dates brings up all of the countries that are showing that film.

Each film’s page shows a list of every country showing it, as well as details of when the film arrived on the search engine and what audio and subtitles it offers.

Almost every country now has Netflix, with a few notable exceptions. That means that the site will often offer very small countries to view the films in Donnie Brasco is available in Aruba and Bonaire, for instance, though it has dropped off the UK library.

The site is run by one man called Brian, juggling it “as a hobby between work and family life”, its owner told TorrentFreak.

“I initially built the site just for myself because the few sites that were providing a service like this were extremely limited in terms of search functionality,” Brian told the file-sharing news site. ““I wanted to be able to see what was available in every country, when it was added, when it was supposed to expire and when it actually expired. Once I completed the initial build for myself I decided to share it with everyone and uNoGS went live in early May 2015.”

Netflix has said many times before that it hopes to do away with region-specific licenses, meaning that everyone who uses the service would be able to watch everything that it has. But that is likely to be some time away, and the company has recently announced that it is launching a major crackdown on unblocker services, apparently in response to complaints by film owners.

[Independent]